5 ways to exercise for busy mums with kids

It can be very difficult to try to find the time (and energy!) to exercise with little ones around the house. I know when my kids were younger, they demanded 100% of my attention when we were at home together, and then I was too exhausted by the time they went to bed to consider going out to the gym. Though it can be a great way to get ‘time out’ and dedicate some much needed and deserved time your yourself, I don’t know many mums that do.

So I ended up trying to involve the kids in my exercise regime. Here are some of the things we tried together. It ended up being a lot of fun and my now almost-6-year-old talks about exercise in a positive way being important to keep him fit and healthy.

  • Walk the dog together. Either take a good sturdy pram or encourage your toddler to ride their scooter or balance bike. I recommend taking the empty pram anyway for when they get tired and need a ride. Most prams can support the scooter and bike on top too.
  • Follow a yoga workout together. There are lots of YouTube clips around. One I found is Mommy and Me Yoga at Home by CamiRose Yoga. You’d be surprised how much the kids enjoy getting out their own yoga mat and setting it up beside Mummy to copy the moves with you.
  • Head to a park. The kids will be entertained on the equipment for ages while you jog some laps around the equipment interspersed with exercises such as sit-ups, push ups, squats, lunges, etc. You can even use the park equipment if you dare!
  • Running races and obstacle courses in the back yard. Who doesn’t love a good competition; I know my kids do. Make it fun with different rules and courses, even let them come up with some themselves. My favourite one at home was complete with Captain America’s shield and Thor’s Hammer to defeat the ‘bad robots’ (or garden stakes) in various places around the yard.
  • Of course, you can always take them to the gym with you. Many gyms offer a crèche service or have a space with kids’ activities so they can occupy themselves. I currently take my 4year old with me to a personal training session once a week and she absolutely loves it. She will copy a lot of my exercises and has even started setting up her own challenge for me to complete at the end of class.

So let your imagination run wild and get the kids involved in your exercise regime at home. You’ll all have a great time and be instilling important healthy movement ideas in your kids early. All while getting exercise yourself at the same time.

 

This post was written by Allyson Flanagan, Physiotherapist and Clinical Pilates Instructor at Stafford Physiotherapy Centre. 

Everything you need to know about deep vein thrombosis

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot in the vein, most commonly occurring in the veins in the calf. Many people will be familiar with this term in relation to long-haul flights, but there are a number of other risk factors including:

  • inactivity from injury or occupation
  • pregnancy
  • smoking
  • heart disease
  • oral contraceptive pills
  • a family history of DVTs

One key concern with a DVT is that it can result in pulmonary embolism. This is when the blood clot breaks off from the leg vein and travels up to the pulmonary artery which can cause blockage affecting the lungs.

Symptoms that you have a DVT may include:
  • pain and tenderness in the lower leg
  • pain when flexing your ankle
  • swelling in the lower leg, ankle and foot
  • red and warm skin on your leg
What should you do if you think you have a DVT?
  • A DVT is diagnosed using Doppler ultrasound
  • It is best to see you GP as soon as possible to organise this scan
  • Your physiotherapist can refer you to your GP if needed
How to minimise your risk of DVT
  • Avoid smoking
  • Minimise alcohol consumption especially when travelling
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water
  • Move about whenever possible before, during and after travelling
  • Don’t sit with your legs crossed
  • Perform leg and foot exercises while seated to encourage circulation
  • Wear compression socks when travelling or if inactive for long periods
  • See your doctor before travelling if you are worried
Circulation Exercises

Lucy has prepared this handy sheet of exercises that you can use to help prevent DVT, particularly when travelling long distances. Try to perform 10 reps of each of these exercises every hour during your trip.

Christmas Trading Hours + Pilates Timetable

Stafford Physiotherapy Centre will be open between Christmas and the new year (except for public holidays).

CHRISTMAS TRADING HOURS

Monday 24th December: 8am – 4pm

Tuesday 25th December: CLOSED

Wednesday 26th December: CLOSED

Thursday 27th December: 7am – 6pm

Friday 28th December: 7am – 4pm

Saturday 29th December: 8am – 12.30pm

Sunday 30th December: CLOSED

Monday 31st December: 8am – 6.30pm

Tuesday 1st January: CLOSED

Back to normal hours from Wednesday 2nd January 2019. Click here to see our full opening hours or to make a booking

CHRISTMAS PILATES SCHEDULE

MONDAY 24TH THURSDAY 27TH FRIDAY 28TH SATURDAY 29TH MONDAY 31ST WEDNESDAY 2ND
7am
Lucy
8am
Lucy
8am
Lucy
Normal classes resume
9.30am
Lucy
9am
Sandra
View Pilates timetable
10am
Megan
10am
Megan
11am
Megan
11am
Megan
11am
Sandra
3pm
Megan

 2pm
Megan

5pm
Sandra
6pm
Sandra

We’d like to take this opportunity to wish all our valued clients a wonderful and safe Christmas. We look forward to seeing you in the new year! 

7 Tips to Prevent Running Injuries

…Run on down to your physio!

Running season is upon us. It’s now less than three months until Bridge To Brisbane and it’s the perfect time to start training, especially if you aren’t a regular runner. Adequate training and race preparation are key to avoiding sports injuries and being able to enjoy your running. You might even run a PB!

Lower limb injuries are very common in runners. The four most common injuries are:

  • shin pain (medial tibial stress syndrome)
  • achilles pain (achilles tendinopathy)
  • arch pain (plantar fasciitis)
  • knee pain (patellofemoral pain)*

Previous lower limb injuries are also a big risk factor for new injuries in runners**. If you have an old injury that still niggles now is the perfect time to see our physiotherapists to ensure this doesn’t hinder your training.

 

Here are our top tips to help prevent running injuries:
1. Invest in a good pair of running shoes

Your feet are going to take thousands of steps while you’re training. It’s worth buying a good pair of running shoes that provide support and cushioning for your feet and legs. Our physiotherapists can recommend a suitable shoe for you. It’s best to alternate wearing your old shoes and your new shoes to break them in slowly. We also work closely with local podiatrists if you need an orthotic made.

2. Start your training program slowly and progress slowly

Your body needs time to adapt to the new loads you are putting it through when running. When your foot hits the ground the transient impact force is up to three times your body weight. Slowly progressing your training allows the different tissues (bone, muscle, cartilage) to adapt and grow stronger. Progressing too quickly often leads to overuse injuries. Rest days are important for recovery and growth.

3. Warm up with dynamic stretching

The aim of a warm up is to increase blood flow to the muscles you are about to exercises. Active movements are ideal for warming up. We suggest brisk walking followed by leg swings, mini squats and walking lunges.

 

 4. Cool down and recover with static stretching or self massage with a foam roller or spikey ball

Recovery is just as important as training itself. Stretching, self massage and physiotherapy can help your body by flushing out lactic acid, returning muscles to their resting length and minimising post training soreness.

5. Drink plenty of water

It’s personal preference if you drink during your running sessions. Generally, you don’t need to drink extra water if you aren’t training more than one hour. The colour of your urine is a good indicator of if you are hydrated. Clear or pale yellow is best.

6. Add some strength and core stability exercises to your training program

Our physiotherapists can advise you on specific exercises for any weaknesses you have. A strength program needs to target the calves, hamstrings, gluts and abdominals. This can be performed at home or in the gym. Our physiotherapists can also write a specific Clinical Pilates program for you.

7. Try to get 7-8 hours sleep per night

Sleep provides rest and recovery time for your body. Training creates micro tears in the body’s tissues that need to heal and grow. The best time for this to happen is during sleep.

 

So, if your goals are to run faster, further and/or pain free, book an appointment to come and see us at Stafford Physiotherapy Centre.

 

This post was written by Lucy Beumer, Sports Physiotherapist and Clinical Pilates Instructor at Stafford Physiotherapy Centre. 

References

*Lopes, A.D., Hespanhol, L.C., Yeung, S.S. et al. What are the Main Running-related Musculoskeletal Injuries? A Systematic Review. Sports Med (2012) 42: 891. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03262301

**van Gent BR, Siem DD, van Middelkoop M, et al. Incidence and determinants of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners: A systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine Published Online First: 01 May 2007. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2006.033548

Meet Our Team: Megan

Megan is a physiotherapist and Pilates instructor at Stafford Physiotherapy and Pilates. She has worked with us since 2013, after completing degrees in both Physiotherapy and Human Movement Studies. She’s pretty impressive! 


What motivates you? 
Moving/exercising regularly, being outdoors, trying new activities and seeing results! I love helping people to improve in their movement and feel great, and motivating others to get the most out of their bodies and enjoy an active life.

What’s your favourite 3pm snack? A coffee and Chobani yoghurt or a protein bar.

Megan and Regina Tilyard Physiotherapist Stafford Physiotherapy CentreWhat do you enjoy most about your job? I love being able to assist people to move better and without pain, providing them with the knowledge and tools to keep injury free, and seeing patients find/rediscover a love for exercise, no matter what sort!

What’s your favourite part of the day? I love to exercise in the morning, it makes me feel positive and happy, and a much nicer person for the rest of the day! Plus breakfast and a coffee are the best reward after.

If you weren’t a physio, what would you be? A travel blogger or professional puppy cuddler.

What’s your favourite restaurant/ cafe? Rogue Bar + Bistro in Newstead.

Would you rather dance, or do karaoke? Karaoke in the car to Sia, Hilltop Hoods or Queen. But I’d much rather go for a run to the music!

Read more about Megan here.